Changeset 222 in t29-www


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Dec 18, 2010, 3:40:14 PM (9 years ago)
Author:
sven
Message:

Some other 15 user contributions for language improvement in English homepage. They were from about 4 different persons where only one told us his name. The system really should remind the user of mentioning his name. At least now heribert recieves the improvement mails, too.

Location:
en
Files:
6 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
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  • en/communication/television.shtm

    r191 r222  
    7171    <div class="box center auto-bildbreite">
    7272        <img src="/shared/photos/kommunikationstechnik/ampex.vr650.jpg" alt="AMPEX VR 650" width="600" height="369" />
    73         <p class="bildtext"><b>AMPEX VR 650</b>, an early bulky transportable video unit from Ampex, equipped with 2-inch tapes from 1964. It was the first transistorized apparature made by Ampex, featuring germanium transistors. Of course the device was not intended for privat use. Although it was versatile, hospitals often recorded radiographies with this apparature.</p>
     73        <p class="bildtext"><b>AMPEX VR 650</b>, an early bulky transportable video unit from Ampex, equipped with 2-inch tapes from 1964. It was the first transistorized apparatus made by Ampex, featuring germanium transistors. Of course the device was not intended for private use. Although it was versatile, hospitals often recorded radiographies with this apparature.</p>
    7474    </div>
    7575
  • en/computer/early-computers.shtm

    r221 r222  
    1010   --><!--#set var="next"         value="analog.shtm"
    1111   --><!--#set var="next_title"   value="Analog and hybrid computers"
     12   --><!--#set var="credits"      value="M. Kaye / Ann Arbor, MI, USA"
    1213 --><title>technikum29 - <!--#echo var="title" --></title>
    1314
     
    3738       
    3839        <p>
    39          One of the museal highlights: The complete PDP-8 system with processor,
    40          big tape deck TU 580 (originally belongs to the PDP-5, year of manufacture
    41          1963), punch card reader/puncher PC 01, hard disc DF 32 with immovable heads
    42          and a teletype as printer. The Classic PDP-8 is called the world's first mass-produced
    43          "minicomputer". Without ICs or their ancestor it is a seccond-generation apparature.
     40         One of the museum highlights: The complete PDP-8 system with processor,
     41         a big tape deck TU-580 (originally belonged to the PDP-5, manufactured in 1963),
     42         punch card reader/puncher PC-01, hard-disc DF-32 with immovable heads
     43         and a teletype as printer. The Classic PDP-8 is considered the world's first mass-produced
     44         "minicomputer". Due it's use of ICs, unlike its predecessors, it is considered
     45                 a second-generation computer.
    4446         <!-- The <b>Classic PDP 8</b> from DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation, Massachusetts):
    4547         He is considered to be the world's first mass-produced "minicomputer" (1965). "Mini" is relative: Only too very
     
    5557           
    5658            <p>DEC's first calculator with integrated circuits was not cheap. The CPU on
    57              its own (in the middle of the picture) without peripherals cost $27000 at that time.<br/>
    58              The main memory had a capacity of 8kB. While calculating a "bigger" problem, possibly some files
    59              (programs, data) had to be swapped on a (magnetic) tape and read in afterwards. DEC developed
    60              a very intelligent operating system (OS/8) which could work very efficiently with such few memory.
     59             alone (pictured in the center) without peripherals cost $27000 at that time.<br/>
     60             The main memory had a capacity of 8kB. While computing a "larg" problem, it was possible to swap
     61             programs or data to files on magnetic tape and read in afterward be reread. DEC developed
     62             an intelligent operating system (OS/8) which worked very efficiently with such little memory.
    6163             It is very interesting to watch this computer working.</p>
    62             <p>If you have not yet seen such a computer, you should know that it is more than 2m high (with
    63              plotter) and has a weight of more than 300 kg.</p>
    64             <p>The peripherals consist of two TU 55 (tape drives), PC 04 (high speed paper tape reader),
    65              Calcomp 563 plotter (at the top) and of course a teletype (not in the picture).</p>
     64            <p>If you have not been in the presence of this computer, you should know that it is quite large.
     65             With the plotter, it stands at a height of almost 7' (2m) and weighting at more than 600 lbs (300kg).</p>
     66            <p>The peripherals consist of two TU-55 (tape drives), a PC-04 (high speed paper tape reader),
     67             Calcomp 563 plotter (at the top) and of course a teletype (not pictured).</p>
    6668        </div>
    6769    </div>
  • en/computer/storage-media.shtm

    r219 r222  
    159159          -20° C to +50°C (-4°F to 122°F).
    160160          <br/>In this way the plated wire storage was developed, based on a couple of
    161           genious ideas. Unfortunately, nowadays it is very error-prone.</p>
     161          ingenious ideas. Unfortunately, nowadays it is very error-prone.</p>
    162162       <p>Clicking on the photography will yield further informations about the
    163163          <a class="go" href="/en/devices/plated-wire-storage.shtm">design of the plated
  • en/dev/translation/submit.php

    r216 r222  
    3838
    3939// setup mail
    40 $to = "sven";
    41 $to .= "@technikum29.de"; // spamschutz (svn!)
     40$to = "sven@, heribert@";
     41$to = str_replace('@', "@technikum29.de", $to); // spamschutz (svn!)
    4242$subject = "t29 translation submission";
    4343if($pagename) $subject .= " for $pagename";
  • en/devices/dec-history.shtm

    r219 r222  
    1111   --><!--#set var="next"         value=""
    1212   --><!--#set var="next_title"   value=""
     13   --><!--#set var="credits"      value="M. Kaye / Ann Arbor, MI, USA"
    1314   --><title>technikum29 - <!--#echo var="title" --></title>
    1415
    1516    <!--#include virtual="/en/inc/head.inc.shtm" -->
    16     <meta name="DC.Title" content="technikum29 - <!--#echo var="title" -->" />
    1717    <meta name="t29.SVN" content="$Id$" />
    18     <meta name="t29.germanoriginal" content="22.08.2008/v5.8FINAL" />
    19     <meta name="t29.thistranslation" content="22.08.2008/v5.8.0FINAL" />
    20     <meta name="t29.comment" content="Initial translation" />
    21     <!--changelog: 23.08.2007/v5.7.5 based on 08.2007/v5.7FINAL": Extraseite neustrukturiert -->
    2218</head>
    2319<body>
     
    2824<div class="cols">
    2925 <div class="leftcol">
    30    <p>Everything started with just an idea: A young engineer from the famous <i>Massachusetts Institute of Technology</i> had seen the novel computer <em>Whirlwind</em> which worked fundamentally different to the common <em>Eniac</em> computer generation at the Lincoln Lab.
    31      <br/>While <em>Eniac</em> computers used batch processing, the new computer implemented the idea of <em>interactive computing</em>.</p>
     26   <p>It all began with an idea: A young engineer from the famous <i>Massachusetts Institute of Technology</i> had seen the novel computer <em>Whirlwind</em>, that worked in a way which was fundamentally different to the common <em>Eniac</em> computer generation at the Lincoln Laboratory.
     27     <br/>While <em>ENIAC</em> computers used batch processing, the new computer implemented the idea of <em>interactive computing</em>.</p>
    3228 
    33     <p>At first sight he recognized the advantages of the new form of computer interaction and the possibilities for even inexperienced computer users. The name of this man was Ken Olsen. His aim was to build an interactive computer for all purposes.
    34             <br/>In August 1957, he founded a small company with three collaborators. He named the new company <em>Digital Equipment Corporation</em>. This name was chosen to obscure his real targets. The big and well-established enterprises like IBM should think that DEC just builds auxillary devices.</p>
     29    <p>At first sight he recognized the advantages of the new form of computer interaction and the possibilities that existed for even inexperienced computer users. The name of this man was Ken Olsen. His aim was to build an all-purpose interactive computer for all purposes.
     30            <br/>In August 1957, he founded a small company with three collaborators. He named the new company <em>Digital Equipment Corporation</em>. This name was chosen to obscure his real intention. The big and well-established enterprises like IBM should think that DEC just builds auxillary devices.</p>
    3531
    36     <p>Three years later, in 1960, Digital presented the first commercial interactive "mini" computer. This was the first PDP system (Programmable Data Processor). It used a word length of 18 bit and costed approx. US$ 120,000. Digital selled only 53 units.</p>
     32    <p>Three years later, in 1960, Digital presented the first commercial, interactive, <em>mini</em>-omputer. This was the first PDP system (Programmable Data Processor). It used a word length of 18 bits, at a cost of approx. US$ 120,000. Only 53 units were sold.</p>
    3733
    38         <p>The begin of mass producing mini computers represents the next milestone. In 1965 Digital presented this first mass produced PDP, called PDP-8. It was sensationally cheap and costed only US$ 18,000.
    39            <br/>Successors of this hit series were the PDP 8I (1967, first computer featuring TTL ICs), PDP 8L (1968, low cost version), PDP 8e (1970, first computer with bus system), later on the PDP 8a and DEC Mate Systems were produced.</p>
     34        <p>The start of mass-produced mini computers represened the next milestone. In 1965, Digital presented this first mass produced PDP, the PDP-8. It was sensationally cheap and costed only US$ 18,000.
     35           <br/>Successors of this hit series were the PDP 8I (1967, the first computer featuring TTL ICs), PDP 8L (1968, low cost version), PDP 8e (1970, the first computer with a bus system), later, the PDP 8a and DEC Mate Systems were produced.</p>
    4036
    4137</div><!-- leftcol -->
     
    4642<dl>
    4743<dt>1963</dt>
    48   <dd>In the German city Munich the first european Digital branch office opened. The first mini computer of the world, the 12 bit computer PDP-5 was announced.</dd>
     44  <dd>In the German city of Munich the first European Digital branch office opened. The first minicomputer of the world, the 12-bit computer, PDP-5 was announced.</dd>
    4945<dt>1966</dt>
    50   <dd>The first Digital shares are selled.</dd>
     46  <dd>The first Digital shares are sold.</dd>
    5147<dt>1967</dt>
    5248  <dd>Digital has 50 branches in 11 countries worldwide. The number of employees increases up to 2,600.</dd>
  • en/devices/univac9400/frontpanel.shtm

    r152 r222  
    1414
    1515    <!--#include virtual="/en/inc/head.inc.shtm" -->
    16     <meta name="DC.Title" content="technikum29 - <!--#echo var="title" -->" />
    17     <meta name="t29.germanoriginal" content="v5.7FINAL" />
    18     <meta name="t29.thistranslation" content="23.08.2007/v5.7.5" />
    19     <!-- meta: t29.germanoriginal="<27.07.2006/v5.5.4" -->
    20 <!-- meta: t29.thistranslation="27.07.2006/v5.5.5" -->
     16    <meta name="t29.SVN" content="$Id$" />
    2117</head>
    2218<body>
     
    2925        <p>Light ermitting diodes (LEDs) has not been invented yet. Little
    3026        glow lamps were used to display the binary states because
    31         filament bulbs would have been too lazy to perform the fast
     27        filament bulbs would have been too slow to perform the fast
    3228        changings. The display features four rotary switches so it can
    3329        be switched between eight different state arrays with 18 bits.</p>
    3430    </div>
    35     <!--
    36     <ul id="nav">
    37         <li><a href="/en/computer/univac9400.shtm#backlink-frontpanel">Univac 9400 overview</a></li>
    38         <li><a href="/en/">technikum29 homepage</a></li>
    39     </ul>
    40     -->
    4131 </div>
    4232
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